Assassin’s Creed Black Flag concept art + scenery

[x] / [x] / [x] / [x]

freystupid:

target reached

Bronze Head of King Sargon of Akkad, 2306 B.C

freystupid:

target reached

Bronze Head of King Sargon of Akkad, 2306 B.C

jeannepompadour:

Etruscan fresco, c. 1600 BC Crete

jeannepompadour:

Etruscan fresco, c. 1600 BC Crete

ancientart:

Ancient Chinese jade burial suit. Han Dynasty, 206 BC - 220 AD.

Courtesy of & currently located at the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum, MA, USA. Photos taken by Daderot.

bvophoto:

Yosemite National Park

sci-universe:

This colorized image is my tribute to astrophysicist Cecilia Payne (1900–1979), a woman who fought her way into science which was then strictly a world only for men. Cecilia discovered the chemical composition of stars and, in particular, that hydrogen and helium are the most abundant elements in stars and, therefore, in the universe. However, she is basically not credited at all with the discovery because of her male superiors.
Cecilia completed her studies at Cambridge in 1923, earning a B.A. degree in 1923. Since at that time a woman could only earn “the Title of a Degree,” she travelled to the US in 1923 to seek greater opportunities.
By the time she was awarded her PhD she had also already published six papers on stellar atmospheres, all by age 25.

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery.
Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

— Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery.

magictransistor:

कपाल (Kapāla)

Via
strangeforeignbeauty.com
strangeforeignbeauty:

Ken Bek @ AMCK Models | Photographed by Marcelle Johnson

strangeforeignbeauty:

Ken Bek @ AMCK Models | Photographed by Marcelle Johnson

Just dance.

historical-nonfiction:

The Bang Pa-In Palace, in Thailand. Summer residence of the monarch and their family, it is an interesting mix of styles. The royal palace is Chinese; see the throne room above, with the distinctive red and gold decor. Smaller buildings are in traditional but simple Thai style. In the later 1800s, King Chulalongkorn renovated Bang Pa-In Palace, adding buildings and gardens in the European style as he went. Today it is an interesting and colorful mix, away from the tourist crowd at two hours north of Bangkok.

Via
Fujifilm SP-3000
frankocean:

photo cred: michael mayren

frankocean:

photo cred: michael mayren